Twitter Didn't Kill E3, You Did.

Last week, I never heard and read so many journalist complain about one thing…in unison.  “If it weren’t for Twitter, E3 would have had a much bigger impact on me.” The reality is, because of the internet as a whole, leaks and breaking news have been scooping our witty, games enthusiast scoopers.  It is great to see the spectacle that is E3 return, but in all honesty, in this age of ‘nowism’ [wanting to know everything instantly even at the cost of accuracy] how can a microblogging site like Twitter be the fault of the leaks which were going to leak baring the sites existence?
Unfortunately, I was one of the many writers/enthusiast that could not attend E3 this year, but thanks to video streaming sites and Twitter it was almost as if I had the best seat in the house; my home.  The weeks leading up to E3 you would see the occasional ‘rumor’ story and a corporate video leak of insert-Sony-product.  The E3 of old, early 2000 and prior, has this mystique to the veteran enthusiast press and industry execs.  It is talked about as if there was this golden-era of E3, which I do not discount, but it is almost referencing some form of 1950’s style of reporting.  This age, this style came from the gigantic bridge a journalist had to mend when delivering these ‘cutting edge’ stories about press conferences, technological innovation and most importantly, video games. At the time news traveled considerably slower than it does now in the age of the tweet.  Journalists could get away with sub-par or uninteresting writing simply because they were delivering content to an audience that had limited access to the source material.  An argument could be made that this ‘limited access’ still exists today, it is more dependent on an internet connection rather than a magazine subscription.

Last week, I never heard and read so many journalist complain about one thing…in unison.  “If it weren’t for Twitter, E3 would have had a much bigger impact on me.” The reality is, because of the internet as a whole, leaks and breaking news have been scooping our witty, games enthusiast scoopers.  It is great to see the spectacle that is E3 return, but in all honesty, in this age of ‘nowism’ [wanting to know everything instantly even at the cost of accuracy] how can a microblogging site like Twitter be the fault of the leaks which were going to leak baring the sites existence?

Unfortunately, I was one of the many writers/enthusiast that could not attend E3 this year, but thanks to video streaming sites and Twitter it was almost as if I had the best seat in the house; my home.  The weeks leading up to E3 you would see the occasional ‘rumor’ story and a corporate video leak of insert-Sony-product.  The E3 of old, early 2000 and prior, has this mystique to the veteran enthusiast press and industry execs.  It is talked about as if there was this golden-era of E3, which I do not discount, but it is almost referencing some form of 1950’s style of reporting.  This age, this style came from the gigantic bridge a journalist had to mend when delivering these ‘cutting edge’ stories about press conferences, technological innovation and most importantly, video games. At the time news traveled considerably slower than it does now in the age of the tweet.  Journalists could get away with sub-par or uninteresting writing simply because they were delivering content to an audience that had limited access to the source material.  An argument could be made that this ‘limited access’ still exists today, it is more dependent on an internet connection rather than a magazine subscription.

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